AMANDA GREEN ALBUMS

Amanda Green

Wicked Witch

by Amanda Green

Released 2007
Ivan Records
Released 2007
Ivan Records
With her eclectic, fun, ethereal and confessional songwriting, Amanda Green takes you on a joyride.
NOTES
With her third album, South Florida musician Green has fully evolved from the smart purveyor of odd pop on Junk and Stuff and The Nineteen Hundreds to a singer-songwriter of dizzying skill and imagination. Accessible and yet mysterious all at once, Wicked Witch gives the lo-fi aesthetic a symphonic bloom. Ragged guitar tones, rounded piano strokes, ethereal noise and familiar chords all converge in a confessional, orchestrated rush.

The Wicked Witch package is illustrated with keepsakes
from Green's childhood, and the music often feels like a document of the struggle to grow up. On the opener Give It a Chance, her voice is a curious, distant flutter against a panoramic wall of sound: "Everything was so inviting/I was 15 years old." Green takes an empty-the-hope-chest approach both to composition and arrangement, as if digging through belongings to find the most poignant objects and assembling them in some highly symbolic order. So Many Ways wraps
a near obsessive love in waves of Wild Thing heavy guitar. Until the Morning walks through a gallery of changes, Beatlesque chords, echoes of ragtime and touches of psychedelia, all guided by Green's gently Vocoder-altered voice. Set alongside all these elaborate songs, Horseshoe is a curve, literally and figuratively, an unadorned piano ballad with a simple plea: "Can you keep me?"

Where and where not to look for love is a recurring question here. The wry, shape-shifting Flashcube Palace warns against being too seduced by pop-star fairy tales
and closes the album with an adage: "Even Walt Disney has never been to Disney World." It's an apt conclusion, illustrated with a totem of childhood and balanced, like a lot of adults disabused of their illusions, between cynical humor and healthy reckoning

Wicked Witch comes with a companion disc, The "Ghost
Album," consisting entirely of Green's pensive solo piano compositions. It's an unnecessary but welcome flourish that takes the listener from Witch's Byzantine lair to a more
contemplative space where Green sounds equally at home.

Sean Piccoli - FT LAUDERDAL SUN SENTINEL